All individuals and groups must abideth through in one way

Anguish is an aspect of existence which all individuals and groups must abideth through in one way. Refugee crises are an example of this suffering and in today’s world it appears to me that no such crisis is better deserving of its title as the Rohingya Crisis is. The layers of anguish go back to the era of World War II; however, the issue is most pressing and urgent now more than ever. The Rohingyas are an ethnic, linguistic, and religious group residing in the Rakhine State of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar. The nation has labeled those of the people group as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh to justify their ethnic expulsion. Myanmar has stripped the Rohingya of their citizenship, terrorized them for decades, destroyed their homes, and wants to keep them from ever coming back. Innocent Rohingya are suffering, thousands have died, and this issue will not fix itself; a solution is needed, and it is needed now. With no tenable, and truly problem-solving solutions having yet been considered, I propose that a sovereign Rakhine Arakan State be established using the United Nations’ array of functions.Anguish is an aspect of existence which all individuals and groups must abideth through in one way. Refugee crises are an example of this suffering and in today’s world it appears to me that no such crisis is better deserving of its title as the Rohingya Crisis is. The layers of anguish go back to the era of World War II; however, the issue is most pressing and urgent now more than ever. The Rohingyas are an ethnic, linguistic, and religious group residing in the Rakhine State of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar. The nation has labeled those of the people group as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh to justify their ethnic expulsion. Myanmar has stripped the Rohingya of their citizenship, terrorized them for decades, destroyed their homes, and wants to keep them from ever coming back. Innocent Rohingya are suffering, thousands have died, and this issue will not fix itself; a solution is needed, and it is needed now. With no tenable, and truly problem-solving solutions having yet been considered, I propose that a sovereign Rakhine Arakan State be established using the United Nations’ array of functions. The Rohingya Crisis is of the most complex and perplexing situations of our world; the causes of which can be seen through the past few decades of Rakhine history. When the British Empire owned Myanmar, which was then known as Burma, under the domain of British India, many individuals freely moved around the then political entity (Southwick). The Rohingya and Myanmar’s prolonged tension first arose during World War II when the Rohingya sided with the British while the rest of Burma sided with Japan in the hopes that after the war they would help end British rule. When Burma became independent in 1948, the nation assumed that the Rohingya would leave and go to Bangladesh; however, that simply was not the case. Myanmar sees the Rohingya as immigrants who were expected to have left the country during the latter half of the twentieth century while the Rohingya themselves claim to be descended from Arab traders who settled the land over a thousand years ago. The truth of the matter is likely more of a shade of grey and will alas never be unveiled (Geography Now). In 1978 Burma launched one of its many operations to expel the Rohingya, this one being Operation Dragon King which forced over 200,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh. Interestingly enough, 170,000 or eighty-five percent of those who left during this operation eventually came back (Vox). What sparked this modern bout of the crisis was an attack by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, one of the Rohingya’s many paramilitary groups, leaving twelve police officers dead on August 25, 2017. Ever since this date the Burmese government and Rohingya paramilitary groups have found themselves on opposing sides of a brutal war wherein thousands of innocent Rohingya are being harmed the most (Vox). Above one can view statistics based on information gathered in June 2018 (Sandall). As one can now see, the causes are deep-rooted and Burmese hate for the Rohingya has sunk itself deep within its culture. The effects of doing nothing in this scenario are wretched at best. This crisis will continue in one form or another far beyond the foreseeable future. The Burmese will continue their operations to remove the Rohingya while they keep on eventually coming back like always. More will die, more livelihoods will be lost, and more atrocities will be committed in later generations. It may not be as bad as it is today at certain points in the future, but it will always get worse again. Here it has become apparent to me that anything is better than continuing this cycle of anguish. The international community has attempted to heal this suffering; however, none of them have actually achieved the goal of ending the cycle despite how noble some operations are. The ASEAN organization or the Association of Southeast Asian Nations has held several meetings to address the crisis. According to the organization, “It is now clear that the displacement of Rohingya is a regional crisis that needs regional solutions. The largest refugee camp in the world sits at the doorstep of ASEAN.” (Jakarta Post). No tenable solutions have yet been made out of these meetings. The United Nationals has already led several motions to raise funds for the refugees living makeshift lives in Bangladesh; in October 2017 a ministerial-level pledging conference was held in Geneva which aimed to get more funds (Ghelani). It was here were almost all of the $434 million relief program goal was made; there were thirty-six pledges ranging from the United Kingdom’s sixty-three million dollars to Lithuania’s twenty-four thousand (Baki). Despite the profound and life-changing effects such aid has on some refugees in already Bangladesh, these funds will not solve the core of the issue. There is nothing being done to aid or prevent the suffering of many generations of Rohingya to come. With these solutions in place the cycle will continue while more and more money will be poured into a matter which could be fixed if the international community would focus on the heart of the issue by putting an end to the cycle. When observing the past few decades of Rohingya history it becomes apparent to me that peace can not exist while the Rohingya do not have a place to call home, they have no haven; and this is something past solutions failed to recognize. What I am proposing is the international community come together to expose Myanmar for its crimes against humanity and to help form a sovereign Rakhine Arakan State for the Rohingya. For Myanmar’s especially gross and heinous actions in 2017, I am suggesting that the nation be referred to the International Criminal Court. This is unlikely to happen if the international community does not first put pressure on Myanmar to allow the ICC to operate within its borders; this does mean imposing sanctions on the country (Al Jazeera). This solution also calls for China to not veto any intervention by a United Nations peace-keeping force to help defend the new state of Rakhine Arakan. In this solution the international community should aid the young nation financially and in writing its constitution which shall accurately represent the population. Above one can view the new state highlighted in red just south of Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh where many Rohingya find themselves fleeing to (Asrar).  What makes this solution superior to all others proposed is it recognizes that a Rohingya heaven must be created for any sort of peace to exist and that looking for speedy repatriation back into Myanmar will not solve the issue. According to Daniel Sullivan, “As the world takes stock of the situation a year since the forced mass expulsion of Rohingya from Myanmar, Refugees International (RI) provides five key priorities to address the Rohingya crisis.”; I will evaluate my solution based on these five priorities (Sullivan). Firstly, crimes against humanity have taken place and must be exposed; in my solution I address this when I recommend Myanmar to the International Criminal Court. Next I address that the ongoing persecution of the Rohingya inside Myanmar must be stopped by eliminating Naypyidaw’s influence over the Rakhine state. Thirdly, my solution upholds the reality that the Rohingya inside Bangladesh are not safe by making it essential to create a separate homeland for the group. I also uphold the vital belief that repatriation to the Rakhine state is essential for a lasting solution; and lastly, by suggesting that Myanmar be sent to the International Criminal Court, I am addressing that steps toward accountability need to be made (Sullivan). All of the past solutions which I have mentioned have yet to address more than a single point while my solution recognizes all five; it is abundantly clear that my solution is the best option. Although my solution is notably the best course of action it will enable the situation to get worse before the conflict is resolved. Due to the economic sanctions placed on the nation, Myanmar will suffer severe economic blows while the population will likely find it in their hearts to blame the Rohingya and let their malice out on them. This short bout of violence will not last because the cycle of anguish will be broken when Myanmar gives in to the demands of the ICC and international community. In the long term however, peace will reign upon the new haven of the Rohingya as Myanmar will now respect the sovereignty of Rakhine Arakan. Intervention such as this will likely cause the international community to focus more money and effort in the situation; however, it will all be immensely worth it. Is it more humane to put an end to the crisis as soon as possible or allow it to go on for many more generations to come? Although the effects of my solution will bring benefits in the end, there are two groups who would clearly oppose my motion. As one can imagine, the Naypyidaw government of Myanmar would not like to see this become a reality as they do not want to just give away their land to supposed illegals from Bangladesh. A proposal such as mine would sound ludicrous to them. The other party which would most likely oppose my solution is the government of China; the fact that China would oppose my solution may be coming out of left-field through the eyes of some, but it is logically supported (Al Jazeera). It is in the country’s best interests to not sour relations with Myanmar who trades most with them. When Myanmar is sanctioned it is China which will be most directly affected; all my solution spells out for China is losses. If one thing is to be made apparent let it be that logical fal